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San Francisco 14, Us 5, Francis 2, Frida Kahlo 1, Andy Warhol 1, Jessie 1, Vince 1, Clustering 1, Toyota 1, Disabilities 1, Toyota Prius 1, City 1, Foreman 1, Union Square 1, John 1, Shane 1, Paris 1, Dolores Park 1, Dolores 1, The City 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    December 6, 2012
    8:00 - 8:30pm PST  

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york city? >> lower manhattan was the first place that took off, then chicago. those early passenger elevators always had an attendant that would take a passenger's request and then operate the car. the big change was the emergence of a electric elevators. starting in 1880, the electric elevator allowed building dollars to go much higher. we evolved from steam hydraulic elevators to the electric elevators that are not that much different from what we are going to see now at the top of the tower. this is the steam room on the top of the state st. francis. -- on top of the state francis. the equipment you see painted green, that is all the original equipment from 1972.
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we are just now in the middle of modernizing this equipment. >> why modernize? doesn't the equipment works fine? >> it does, it is of analog and intensive, and there are some additional controls. let me introduce the foreman to you. this is vince. he can do a better job explaining the project details. >> what is happening here, what are you doing? >> we are doing a major modernization. we are tearing out the old system, logic controls, and generator controls, and we will be going over to solid state. this is not your standard selector. it does not have a tape that runs it. because these are outside
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elevators -- these are unique to the city. >> and this is going away with the upgrade. >> that is right. none of these will be here. we have retrofitted three elevators so far and now we're doing the outside cars. >> so this is what will be replacing -- >> this will be replacing the generator controller and control system. we are down to about 15 or 20 relays, down from about 100, which means much less maintenance. this thing had been running for about six months now, but we still have eight cars here to do. >> great job.
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>> we have looked at past the elevators and present. now let's look at the future. we are taking a look at some of the most exciting technologies in elevators. george, tell us about destination elevators. >> this is the technology of the future. probably the biggest single investment in elevators. san francisco has embraced the technology more than any other city in the country. a big advantage with us is passengers get to their floors sooner and there is more opportunity of customization of features for individual service. four issues of security and accessibility, this is a big advantage over traditional elevators. digest i understand these are
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rehabilitated upgrades of existing elevators? >> yes, these are upgrades to the original elevators from 1980. all the controls and wiring has changed but the physical mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the elevator. imagine you are going into the airport. you would not get on the first airplane departing, you would get on the airplane that is going to the city you are going. we are doing the same here.
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in this case, we are going to the ninth floor. this building has security, so i also have an access card, which gives us permission, and then we go to the assigned elevator, which is elevator a. >> and this is only stopping at floors 4 and 9. i do not see any buttons in here at all, except for the door and the alarm. >> we only have the standard buttons required by code and safety, but there is no need to have floor numbers anymore. >> and it does not make a lot of stops. it goes to your floor and everyone else. >> the system it efficiency, because we do not have to make as many stops, is a big improvement.
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>> we have invited jessie from the center for independent living to come and tell us how destination elevators interfaced with persons with disabilities. >> when destination elevators storfirst started appearing, thy presented a number of challenges to individuals with disabilities. what happened was, elevator technology outpaced california building code. building code has a number a provision that makes traditional elevators usable by people with disabilities, but destination elevators presented challenges, particularly with cited. how do you know to get from this keypad to your our corporate car? >> we had a terrific program where we develop and administer the bulletin, which your help, elevator companies, involvement
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from the public, and you can tell us the outcome of that. >> what is amazing about the process is we had both government and private industry, as well as people with disabilities at the table for three years creating these accessibility standards. what we are doing here is being looked at by the department of justice access board and state architect's office. that is how good our standards are. would you like to see? i am going to push the access key which will activate the voice. i want to go to floor 24. ok, to the left. >> elevator j has arrived. >> that was smooth. >> i am getting a text message.
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it is amazing, these destination elevators. pretty soon, the signal that changes the system will be able to be routed through blue tooth and your phone, which is amazing. my iphone will be able to access the controls. in paris already, they are rounding the pedestrian signals through blue tooth and into people's phones. so the future is really exciting and technology will make it quite a journey for everybody. >> thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> so now i would like to introduce the chief engineer.
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can you tell us about your experience? >> there were a lot of anticipation about how people would respond. at first, we had to get in front of people to direct them from their habits. early morning, they are more into carrying their coffee and going inside of the elevator and then spilling their coffee to hit the keys. we got right in front of them, stopped them and told them exactly what they had to do. that helped out a lot. the other thing that helped were the lights in the lobby would tell them where the elevator was. a lot of these systems have not done that. we were the first to do that. the nice thing is we've got less spills in the lobby, too. you get into the elevator in the
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morning, and somebody is standing in front of the buttons and you cannot get to it. people are fighting each other, spilling coffee and stuff, so this works out well. once you get inside, you are going to the floor that you have already decided on the outside. it really helped traffic flow and security as well. >> would you say your experience has been a good one? >> excellent. very positive. >> let's go on a tour.
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>> here we have the network control. there are two groups here. in case one fails. there is automatic redundancy. each of these cables connect to each device and communicates with the main global server. the previous equipment was a relay control, and it was analog logic. this has many advantages in that it can be custom program to and can readjust to changes. it can do a multitude of things, like the lights blinking in the lobby. those are all programs that can be controlled by this equipment.
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before, this room was filled relay panels collect -- that clicked. they had had a big rotator that told the person or the elevator was. we can level these cars with an 1 millimeter. it used to vary on the temperature by up to half an inch. that caused tripping hazards. now you walk out and it is a smooth transition. it is important for the disabled as well. over here is the controller. but this does is it provides information to the elevator where to go. receives commands from within the elevator and from the destination dispatched central -- dispatched central. these elevators are precisely the electronic breaks, so they
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need to be very precise. in accordance with the vfd to supply power to the elevator motor, which is right here. these are original d.c. drives. d.c. was in place at the beginning of elevators. it was easier to control. currently, new elevators are ac drives. but they are so expensive to replace and waste of materials. we have made it more efficient by providing aid to the electrical system to drive it. this is controlled by the same transistor that controls the toyota prius. when the elevator is empty, the counterweight polls the elevator and it generates electricity by breaking. the same thing as in your toyota creosote or another hybrid car. -- prius or another hybrid car.
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here inside we have the ibtv drive. this is important for landing of the elevator. also, acceleration and deceleration, if there is instability in a car, can be reduced. >> so we have taken a ride in an antique elevator. >> this was an elevator built in 1913. >> we have checked out current elevator technology. >> these were installed in 1972, outside observation elevators. >> it is not standard because there is no tape that runs it. but shane we have seen the future of the elevator
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technology. >> i am going to push the access key which will access the voice. >> this has precise generation of power, which is important for highly acrilan the landing of the elevator. >> what happens next week and not know but it will be exciting. thank you for showing us this interesting technology. >> >> san francisco recreation and parks department offers classes for the whole family. rec and parks has a class for everyone. discover what is available now and get ready to get out and play.
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henri matisse. frida kahlo. andy warhol. discover the next great artist. get out and play and get inspired with toddler classes. experience art where making a mess is part of the process. classes and the size the artistic process rather than the product. children have the freedom to explore materials at their own pace and in their own way. talks love art, especially when they died into the creative process -- dive into the creative process. at the end of the classes, they have cleaned and washup. of.com great way to get out and play.
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for more information, visit sfrecpark.org. that out and play and get into the groove. rec and parks offers dance classes for seniors. first-time beginners or lifetime enthusiasts -- all are welcome. enjoy all types of music. latins also, country and western. it is a great way to exercise while having lots of fun. seniors learn basic moves and practice a variety of routines. improve your posture, balance, and flexibility. it is easy. get up on your feet and step to
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the beat. senior dance class is from sf rec and park. a great way to get out and play. >> for more information, >> so, we're just going to take you through this really quickly. over 200 parks, over 1100 facilities are all contained within this. everything is based around you as a human being have your app. if you're looking for a park or
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if you're not familiar with any of the parks here in the city are, this app is a perfect accessory. so we're basically zooming in on the map right now. you can see the clustering 2 12 parks. as you get closer in, it lets you know where you're at. i'll zoom in on a park. you can see many different parks here. if you go to dolores, we'll start to see all of the facilities that they have available. looks like there's a tennis court, a dog play area, some children's park play areas. and if you actually go into one of the children's play area
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maybe, you can see some details about it. any news about each of the parks is going to be referenced here through a feed. ability to donate to the rec and park. let's say a ballfield, you'd be getting ballfield information. if there's close out based on rain. and you can do some filtering, spot-check the filtering real quick. this is what's near right now. filter, we've got, i don't know, what is it, over 10 categories, maybe closer to 20. and basically anything you're looking for, you can turn on right here. for me, i'm a dog owner. maybe i want to take the kids as well. and i want to find a park that has all of these things. i filter, i go back. i'll find which ones are the
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closest via the list or the map view. and then when you actually go ahead and click on any of these parks, you'll be brought to -- you should be brought to the ones that have actual dog parks and the other filters that were put on the picnic area. so, there you see you've got dog play area, picnic area. additionally, there's feedback that can be pushed through this. any reservations for the picnic areas in park and rec, golden gate park has quite a few. you can actually go ahead and begin to do reservations on here. you just choose your picnic table and go through this.
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you can also search for whatever it is that you're looking for. if you're looking for dolores park, we just did a search for dolores, brings you right to it. you can go inside and take a look at what's available there. and you can also get directions. zoom back in on this. and, so, very simple, just direction. does anyone have any questions? okay. we've got about 8 minutes until we've got the mayor coming on. so -- >> [inaudible]. >> hi, i'm the founder and ceo of apple-liscious. a couple things to talk about for the mobile app. we built the platform for the
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department of rec and park. looking towards the future, which is really kind of what bill ginsler was doing, making information first, but second, adding the financial component, making transactions which we have built into the mobile commerce platform with the hierarchical structure from the top down, enabling the city to actually manage all of their own financial transactions. from ticketing, reservations, permitting, just about every component you can think of, of interacting with the city as a business itself, which most people -- which is kind of a big differentiation factor in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out
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to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show
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another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly how many people go by some of the busiest areas in san francisco. so, you can see here san francisco, on average total, i think we had 150 people cross
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our sensors on average for every sensor. in case you want to go into time density. so, we end up getting these really, really great visualizations of the busiest times and the least busiest times of people moving around san francisco. you want to go down into union square? you can see the data changes dramatically when we change the neighborhood. and just illustrates how different every neighborhood in san francisco really is. we're announcing today that we're providing some of this data to the city as a kind of public service to help the citizens here figure out how many people walk around their neighborhood. but mostly it's to help public service, like the fire department, the police department, the mta know more about how people move around.
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so, we're providing crowd data. so, if a thousand people pass one of our sensors in an hour, that data will be available publicly. every month. so, chris, do you want to go a little deeper? >> you can see we have a lot of blocks around union square covered. when you show this data to property owners and real estate agents and to retailers, they want to know more about how much -- how many people walk in front of their store every day, kind of the story -- the way i thought of the idea was standing in my balcony looking down at walgreens and realizing they had no idea how many people pass their store every day. they don't know that, how do they know if they're successful because the weather is nice, or because they did something right. so, you want to go into business hours?
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the wi-fi store here. so, one of our clients is saks fifth avenue and we end up giving them some really great charts about how many people pass while they're open. so, you can see here. these are the hours that they're open. and the dark areas are the hours that they're closed. and if they're open from 10:00 to 7:00 p.m., they capture 81% of the people that walk by. so, that might mean that they want to move their hours one way or the other and capture more people, or stay the same. and it's just data they didn't have before. and i think you can imagine what 5% more people, more customers to a big retailer would be in revenue. i can't tell if they're trying to cut me short or telling me to keep going. [laughter] >> this wasn't even -- this wasn't even part of it. i guess people are just late. so, i get up here. all right. yeah, so, if you go down and in
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our interface, this is a web app that's available to all our customers, you can see here the busiest day in san francisco is friday. the busiest time, the busiest hour on average is 1:00 to 2:00 p.m.. on september 14th was the busiest day of last month. and the people can line this data up with their sales data or with public transit or anything they're looking at and they'll be able to figure out real quickly if there's a correlation. and if there's more pedestrians, less pedestrians. what? >> [inaudible]. >> i'm sorry? >> [inaudible]. >> so, this is a tool that we're developing based on the data that we're announcing today. you can see them over here a little bit better. but you can see that to most departments, most agencies in san francisco, the city, most agencies, they'll be able

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